11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Rahimullah, 22, left, an Afghan National Army soldier who suffered a traumatic double amputation of his legs to a Taliban IED in Paktika province, Hamza, 20, center, an Afghan National Army soldier who also suffered a traumatic double amputation of his legs to an IED, and Islamudding, 22, right, an Afghan National Army Soldier who suffered a traumatic amputation of his left leg, and extensive shrapnel wounds in Kunar Province, took breaks to adjust their prosthetics and rest between physiotherapy sessions at the International Committee of the Red Cross's orthopedic center in Kabul, Afghanistan.
       
     
 12/7/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  A young Afghan National Policeman who was wounded in both legs and his right arm by a Taliban IED was transferred from the Operating Theater into the recovery ward after going through an follow on operation at the Italian NGO Emergency's hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  As US and allied troops continue to draw down their forces in Afghanistan, much of the combat and security responsibilities in the districts they are departing have been transferred to the Afghan Security Forces. In October, ISAF Commanding General John Campbell estimated that the number of Afghan security forces killed or wounded this year would be between 7,000-9,000—a dramatic increase from the level of US and allied casualties as Afghan forces lack much of the medical expertise and logistics that that ISAF forces deployed in force throughout their combat operations.
       
     
 12/7/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  The head nurse at Emergency's Lashkar Gah hospital, right, comforted a police officer wounded in both legs was crying in pain when they went on their morning rounds.  As US and allied troops continue to draw down their forces in Afghanistan, much of the combat and security responsibilities in the districts they are departing have been transferred to the Afghan Security Forces. In October, ISAF Commanding General John Campbell estimated that the number of Afghan security forces killed or wounded this year would be between 7,000-9,000—a dramatic increase from the level of US and allied casualties as Afghan forces lack much of the medical expertise and logistics that that ISAF forces deployed in force throughout their combat operations.  Many members of the Afghan Security Forces are wounded by IED's, resulting in traumatic amputations—leaving them with high degrees of disability in a society saturated with generations of war wounded that see's those with disabilities as a burden. Additionally, while seriously wounded members of the Afghan Army seem to be receiving a modest pension once they are discharged, many question how long these pensions will last, sighting corruption and mismanagement as concerns. Members of the Afghan National Police, and Afghan Local Police are less lucky—with many receiving nothing, or having their pension stolen before it makes it's way into their accounts.
       
     
 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Dr. Alberto Cairo, photographed in his office next to a vase holding the chrysanthemums that were brought into his office at the Kabul Orthopedic Center, run by the ICRC, by coincidence on the anniversary of a close friends death.  Dr. Alberto Cairo, an Italian, has worked for 25 years, helping disabled Afghan's and those wounded in war through their recovery, adaptation to prosthetics and reintegration into society.
       
     
 12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  Mohammad Qassim, 28, an Afghan Local Policeman from Marjah district who lost his right leg to a Taliban IED, shielded his face from the sun as he went through Heroin withdrawals, outside at the hospital operated by the Italian NGO, Emergency, in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Mr. Qassim, originally from Uruzgan, lost his right leg to a Taliban IED in Marjah, and is also recovering from Heroin and Opium addiction in addition to the traumatic amputation of his right leg—which doctors at Emergency say is common among wounded members of the police they treat in Helmand. Unlike the Afghan National Army, which has a more robust chain of medical logistics and treatment facilities, the Afghan National Police, and especially the Afghan Local Police are often treated at local hospitals, or by NGO's.
       
     
 12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  An Afghan Policeman wounded in the right leg by gunfire which shattered the bone, used guides to walk in the physiotherapy section of the hospital run by the Italian NGO, Emergency, in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
       
     
 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Young Afghan National Army soldiers who suffered traumatic amputations of their legs took a break in the sun between physiotherapy sessions at the International Committee of the Red Cross's Kabul orthopedic center.
       
     
 12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  An Afghan National Policeman lay in bed with an IV in his arm, pumping blood donated for his wounded colleague, Torjah, into a bag below.
       
     
 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Rahimullah, 22, an Afghan National Army soldier who lost both of his legs to a Taliban IED in Paktika province, where he was deployed, massaged his soar stumps between physiotherapy exercises at the International Committee of the Red Cross's Orthopedic Center in Kabul, Afghanistan.
       
     
 12/13/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, photographed sitting on his bed (the text on the blanket says "Afghanistan has a bright future") in the small room that he rents in a Kabul slum for approximately 50 USD per month, that houses other single men. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.
       
     
 12/13/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, was helped in his wheelchair over the rough dirt courtyard to the main street by a young friend as he prepared to leave the small room that he rents in a Kabul slum for approximately 50 USD per month, for his nightly begging route. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.
       
     
 12/9/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, begged for change near the square where the US Embassy is located in Kabul, Afghanistan. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.
       
     
 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Rahimullah, 22, left, an Afghan National Army soldier who suffered a traumatic double amputation of his legs to a Taliban IED in Paktika province, Hamza, 20, center, an Afghan National Army soldier who also suffered a traumatic double amputation of his legs to an IED, and Islamudding, 22, right, an Afghan National Army Soldier who suffered a traumatic amputation of his left leg, and extensive shrapnel wounds in Kunar Province, took breaks to adjust their prosthetics and rest between physiotherapy sessions at the International Committee of the Red Cross's orthopedic center in Kabul, Afghanistan.
       
     

11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Rahimullah, 22, left, an Afghan National Army soldier who suffered a traumatic double amputation of his legs to a Taliban IED in Paktika province, Hamza, 20, center, an Afghan National Army soldier who also suffered a traumatic double amputation of his legs to an IED, and Islamudding, 22, right, an Afghan National Army Soldier who suffered a traumatic amputation of his left leg, and extensive shrapnel wounds in Kunar Province, took breaks to adjust their prosthetics and rest between physiotherapy sessions at the International Committee of the Red Cross's orthopedic center in Kabul, Afghanistan.

 12/7/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  A young Afghan National Policeman who was wounded in both legs and his right arm by a Taliban IED was transferred from the Operating Theater into the recovery ward after going through an follow on operation at the Italian NGO Emergency's hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  As US and allied troops continue to draw down their forces in Afghanistan, much of the combat and security responsibilities in the districts they are departing have been transferred to the Afghan Security Forces. In October, ISAF Commanding General John Campbell estimated that the number of Afghan security forces killed or wounded this year would be between 7,000-9,000—a dramatic increase from the level of US and allied casualties as Afghan forces lack much of the medical expertise and logistics that that ISAF forces deployed in force throughout their combat operations.
       
     

12/7/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

A young Afghan National Policeman who was wounded in both legs and his right arm by a Taliban IED was transferred from the Operating Theater into the recovery ward after going through an follow on operation at the Italian NGO Emergency's hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

As US and allied troops continue to draw down their forces in Afghanistan, much of the combat and security responsibilities in the districts they are departing have been transferred to the Afghan Security Forces. In October, ISAF Commanding General John Campbell estimated that the number of Afghan security forces killed or wounded this year would be between 7,000-9,000—a dramatic increase from the level of US and allied casualties as Afghan forces lack much of the medical expertise and logistics that that ISAF forces deployed in force throughout their combat operations.

 12/7/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  The head nurse at Emergency's Lashkar Gah hospital, right, comforted a police officer wounded in both legs was crying in pain when they went on their morning rounds.  As US and allied troops continue to draw down their forces in Afghanistan, much of the combat and security responsibilities in the districts they are departing have been transferred to the Afghan Security Forces. In October, ISAF Commanding General John Campbell estimated that the number of Afghan security forces killed or wounded this year would be between 7,000-9,000—a dramatic increase from the level of US and allied casualties as Afghan forces lack much of the medical expertise and logistics that that ISAF forces deployed in force throughout their combat operations.  Many members of the Afghan Security Forces are wounded by IED's, resulting in traumatic amputations—leaving them with high degrees of disability in a society saturated with generations of war wounded that see's those with disabilities as a burden. Additionally, while seriously wounded members of the Afghan Army seem to be receiving a modest pension once they are discharged, many question how long these pensions will last, sighting corruption and mismanagement as concerns. Members of the Afghan National Police, and Afghan Local Police are less lucky—with many receiving nothing, or having their pension stolen before it makes it's way into their accounts.
       
     

12/7/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

The head nurse at Emergency's Lashkar Gah hospital, right, comforted a police officer wounded in both legs was crying in pain when they went on their morning rounds.

As US and allied troops continue to draw down their forces in Afghanistan, much of the combat and security responsibilities in the districts they are departing have been transferred to the Afghan Security Forces. In October, ISAF Commanding General John Campbell estimated that the number of Afghan security forces killed or wounded this year would be between 7,000-9,000—a dramatic increase from the level of US and allied casualties as Afghan forces lack much of the medical expertise and logistics that that ISAF forces deployed in force throughout their combat operations.

Many members of the Afghan Security Forces are wounded by IED's, resulting in traumatic amputations—leaving them with high degrees of disability in a society saturated with generations of war wounded that see's those with disabilities as a burden. Additionally, while seriously wounded members of the Afghan Army seem to be receiving a modest pension once they are discharged, many question how long these pensions will last, sighting corruption and mismanagement as concerns. Members of the Afghan National Police, and Afghan Local Police are less lucky—with many receiving nothing, or having their pension stolen before it makes it's way into their accounts.

 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Dr. Alberto Cairo, photographed in his office next to a vase holding the chrysanthemums that were brought into his office at the Kabul Orthopedic Center, run by the ICRC, by coincidence on the anniversary of a close friends death.  Dr. Alberto Cairo, an Italian, has worked for 25 years, helping disabled Afghan's and those wounded in war through their recovery, adaptation to prosthetics and reintegration into society.
       
     

11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Dr. Alberto Cairo, photographed in his office next to a vase holding the chrysanthemums that were brought into his office at the Kabul Orthopedic Center, run by the ICRC, by coincidence on the anniversary of a close friends death.

Dr. Alberto Cairo, an Italian, has worked for 25 years, helping disabled Afghan's and those wounded in war through their recovery, adaptation to prosthetics and reintegration into society.

 12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  Mohammad Qassim, 28, an Afghan Local Policeman from Marjah district who lost his right leg to a Taliban IED, shielded his face from the sun as he went through Heroin withdrawals, outside at the hospital operated by the Italian NGO, Emergency, in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Mr. Qassim, originally from Uruzgan, lost his right leg to a Taliban IED in Marjah, and is also recovering from Heroin and Opium addiction in addition to the traumatic amputation of his right leg—which doctors at Emergency say is common among wounded members of the police they treat in Helmand. Unlike the Afghan National Army, which has a more robust chain of medical logistics and treatment facilities, the Afghan National Police, and especially the Afghan Local Police are often treated at local hospitals, or by NGO's.
       
     

12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

Mohammad Qassim, 28, an Afghan Local Policeman from Marjah district who lost his right leg to a Taliban IED, shielded his face from the sun as he went through Heroin withdrawals, outside at the hospital operated by the Italian NGO, Emergency, in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province. Mr. Qassim, originally from Uruzgan, lost his right leg to a Taliban IED in Marjah, and is also recovering from Heroin and Opium addiction in addition to the traumatic amputation of his right leg—which doctors at Emergency say is common among wounded members of the police they treat in Helmand. Unlike the Afghan National Army, which has a more robust chain of medical logistics and treatment facilities, the Afghan National Police, and especially the Afghan Local Police are often treated at local hospitals, or by NGO's.

 12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  An Afghan Policeman wounded in the right leg by gunfire which shattered the bone, used guides to walk in the physiotherapy section of the hospital run by the Italian NGO, Emergency, in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.
       
     

12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

An Afghan Policeman wounded in the right leg by gunfire which shattered the bone, used guides to walk in the physiotherapy section of the hospital run by the Italian NGO, Emergency, in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Young Afghan National Army soldiers who suffered traumatic amputations of their legs took a break in the sun between physiotherapy sessions at the International Committee of the Red Cross's Kabul orthopedic center.
       
     

11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Young Afghan National Army soldiers who suffered traumatic amputations of their legs took a break in the sun between physiotherapy sessions at the International Committee of the Red Cross's Kabul orthopedic center.

 12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan  An Afghan National Policeman lay in bed with an IV in his arm, pumping blood donated for his wounded colleague, Torjah, into a bag below.
       
     

12/6/2014 Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan

An Afghan National Policeman lay in bed with an IV in his arm, pumping blood donated for his wounded colleague, Torjah, into a bag below.

 11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Rahimullah, 22, an Afghan National Army soldier who lost both of his legs to a Taliban IED in Paktika province, where he was deployed, massaged his soar stumps between physiotherapy exercises at the International Committee of the Red Cross's Orthopedic Center in Kabul, Afghanistan.
       
     

11/22/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Rahimullah, 22, an Afghan National Army soldier who lost both of his legs to a Taliban IED in Paktika province, where he was deployed, massaged his soar stumps between physiotherapy exercises at the International Committee of the Red Cross's Orthopedic Center in Kabul, Afghanistan.

 12/13/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, photographed sitting on his bed (the text on the blanket says "Afghanistan has a bright future") in the small room that he rents in a Kabul slum for approximately 50 USD per month, that houses other single men. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.
       
     

12/13/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, photographed sitting on his bed (the text on the blanket says "Afghanistan has a bright future") in the small room that he rents in a Kabul slum for approximately 50 USD per month, that houses other single men. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.

 12/13/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, was helped in his wheelchair over the rough dirt courtyard to the main street by a young friend as he prepared to leave the small room that he rents in a Kabul slum for approximately 50 USD per month, for his nightly begging route. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.
       
     

12/13/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, was helped in his wheelchair over the rough dirt courtyard to the main street by a young friend as he prepared to leave the small room that he rents in a Kabul slum for approximately 50 USD per month, for his nightly begging route. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.

 12/9/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan  Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, begged for change near the square where the US Embassy is located in Kabul, Afghanistan. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.
       
     

12/9/2014 Kabul, Afghanistan

Fardeen, 24, a former Afghan National Policeman who was wounded by an IED in Paktika province, begged for change near the square where the US Embassy is located in Kabul, Afghanistan. Once a Sergeant in the police, Mr. Fardeen now says that his family has disowned him, and he begs at night in order to not be seen by people who might recognize him. Despite losing his legs in the line of service, Fardeen says he receives no pension or compensation from the Afghan government.